Inside Out
Curriculum

With this curriculum, we hope to inspire and help you spark a conversation among young people on any topic that you choose. We encourage you to empower your participants to make this Action their own and get them involved in as much of the process as possible.

LESSON PLAN

BEFORE

INTRODUCE THE PROJECT!

Introduce the Inside Out Project
Explain how the Project was Created

- Talk about JR and his artistic journey.

- Watch JR's TED Talk, announcing the launch of the Inside Out Project.

- Watch one of JR's movies such as Faces Places or Inside Out.

Talk about the Inside Out Project

The Inside Out Project was born from the endeavor of changing the world through art. It is a platform that helps people from all around the world to express a message that is important to them, using art.
Anyone can create what we call an “Action” about anything they want, anywhere in the world. More than 400,000 people have participated in 138 countries and territories.

Explain the process

1. Communities come together and compose a common message such as:

  • Celebrating heritage in Peru
  • Fighting for gender equality in Iceland
  • Highlighting the 11 million undocumented immigrants in the United States
  • Fighting government censorship in Turkey

2. They then photograph everyone who supports the message.

3. The group leader, or "Group Leader," then sends the portraits to the Inside Out team, which prints them and sends them back to the Group Leader.

4. The community comes together to create these large portrait installations to promote their message.

It is through the photos of these installations that the message travels around the world. Through Inside Out Actions, you see that communities all over the world have similar interests and are facing the same issues as you. The impact is local but global.
 

        

Introduce your Action
Give examples of Actions related to yours

Use the filters on the map to find Actions with a wide array of themes. If you know your message, find Actions around the world with similar themes to show how participants everywhere connect through common interests and issues.

Feel free to have your students explore the map or browse our Instagram page to find Actions that speak to them and themes that interest them.

Articulate your Action

If you have selected your message, explain it to your students and why it is relevant to them.
If your students are participating in selecting the message, ask them questions to help you narrow down a topic.

  • What​ ​do​ ​YOU​ ​stand​ ​for?
  • Who​ ​are​ ​the​ ​people​ ​you​ ​want​ ​your​ ​Group​ ​Action​ ​to​ ​represent?
  • What​ ​kind​ ​of​ ​issues​ ​exist​ ​in​ ​your​ ​school​/the world ​today?​ ​In​ ​your​ ​opinion,​ ​why​ ​do​ ​they​ ​exist​ ​and how​ ​did​ ​they​ ​spread?
  • What​ ​could​ ​be​ ​a​ ​solution​ ​to​ ​these​ ​problems?
  • Do​ ​you​ ​think​ ​your​ ​Inside​ ​Out​ ​action​ ​could​ ​help​ ​deal​ ​with​ ​these​ ​issues?​ ​Why​ ​and​ ​how?

We encourage you to have your students choose or write your statement.

  • Define the issue.
  • Write your message.
Define your goals

Discuss with your students how creating an Action will help them achieve their goal and express a message.

  • What can an Action’s effect be?
  • How can doing an Inside Out Action help a community?
  • Who do they want to reach?
  • What do they want people to think?
  • How does it feel to be so visible?
  • How can an Inside Out Action impact other people and yourselves?

Help them take up space to express themselves.

Facilitate a Reflection

Depending on the age of the students and the subject being taught, students can create their own work in response to the project. Those can take many forms such as interviewing each other, finding a word/sentence to express their identity/opinion/interest, researching a theme.


The following are some examples of exercises you can do with your students or conversations you can start. These examples are only a few ideas of topics to address. You will find many more examples of activities led by educators in our case study section, on our map, or by asking our team!

 

You can easily put your questions in a questionnaire format and collect answers from your students.

Talk about Art & Public Space
Street art
  • What​ ​do​ ​you​ ​think​ ​street​ ​art​ ​is?
  • Who is creating art​ ​in​ ​your​ ​community/neighbourhood?
  • What​ ​are​ ​their​ ​goals?
  • Is​ ​there​ ​a​ ​message?
  • What​ ​can​ ​street​ ​art​ ​tell​ ​us​ ​about​ ​society?
  • How​ ​can​ ​street​ ​art​ ​be​ ​used​ ​as​ ​a​ ​tool​ ​for​ ​change?
  • What​ ​might​ ​street​ ​art​ ​accomplish​ ​that​ ​other​ ​forms​ ​of​ ​activism​ ​cannot?
Illegality
  • What​ ​is​ ​the​ ​legislation​ ​in​ ​your​ ​community/city/state?​ ​What​ ​about​ ​other​ ​countries?
  • Where is public art accepted and where is it forbidden?
  • What types of street art are considered acceptable?
  • What​ ​do​ ​you​ ​think​ ​about​ ​it?
Reclaiming​ Public Space
  • What​ ​is​ ​public​ ​space?​ ​Who​ ​does​ ​it​ ​belong​ ​to?​ ​What​ ​differences​ ​do​ ​you​ ​see​ ​between public​ ​and​ ​private​ ​spaces ​?
  • How​ ​do​ ​public​ ​spaces​ ​such​ ​as​ ​city​ ​streets,​ ​parks,​ ​and​ ​monuments​ ​shape​ ​and​ ​reflect​ ​the identities​ ​of​ ​the​ ​people​ ​who​ ​live​ ​there ​?
  • What​ ​kind​ ​of​ ​images​ ​do​ ​you​ ​see​ ​in​ ​public​ ​space?​ ​Who​ ​put​ ​them​ ​there?​ ​What​ ​is​ ​their purpose?
  • Does​ ​it​ ​make​ ​a​ ​difference​ ​if​ ​artwork​ ​is​ ​displayed​ ​in​ ​a​ ​public​ ​space​ ​as​ ​opposed​ ​to​ ​an​ ​art gallery?​ ​How​ ​so?
  • What​ ​distinguishes​ ​the​ ​Inside​ ​Out​ ​posters​ ​from​ ​other​ ​forms​ ​of​ ​visual​ ​communication, such​ ​as​ ​advertising​ ​and​ ​signage ​?
Portraits and Identity
  • What​ ​is​ ​an​ ​identity?​ ​What​ ​purpose​ ​does​ ​identity​ ​serve?​ ​Talk​ ​about​ how you identify personally versus how others identify you.
  • What​ ​is​ ​the​ ​connection​ ​between​ ​a​ ​person’s​ ​identity​ ​and​ ​their​ ​face/expression?
  • How​ ​can​ ​portraits​ ​give​ ​voice​ ​to​ ​the​ ​identity​ ​of​ ​a​ ​group​ ​or​ ​community?​ ​Think​ ​of individualism​​ ​versus​​ ​group.
  • Have​ ​you​ ​already​ ​seen​ ​the​ ​face​ ​of​ ​people​ ​used​ ​for​ ​another​ ​purpose?​ ​Give​ ​your​ ​opinion about​ ​it.
Building Community
  • What’s a “community”?
  • How​ ​does​ ​someone​ ​identify​ ​with​ ​his/her​ ​own​ ​community?
  • How do you create a community?
  • What makes a community flourish?
  • What do communities need to survive?
  • How do you build a community?
Art and Social Change
  • Do​ ​research​ ​about​ ​portraiture​ ​in​ ​Art​ ​History.​ ​How​ ​did​ ​portraiture​ ​change​ ​from​ ​the​ ​20th century​ ​to​ ​today?​ ​Thinking​ ​about:​ ​photography​ ​x​ ​painting;​ ​digital​ ​x​ ​analog;​ ​selfies;​ ​artist role.
  • What​ ​role​ ​do​ ​you​ ​think​ ​art​ ​can​ ​or​ ​should​ ​play​ ​in​ ​addressing​ ​social​ ​issues​ ​and​ ​improving conditions​ ​for​ ​the​ ​individuals​ ​and​ ​communities​ ​they​ ​represent?
  • How​ ​can​ ​we​ ​use​ ​art​ ​to​ ​honor​ ​and​ ​remember​ ​people?
  • In​ ​what​ ​ways​ ​can​ ​art​ ​be​ ​an​ ​effective​ ​medium​ ​to​ ​address​ ​social​ ​injustice​ ​issues?
  • What​ ​are​ ​some​ ​of​ ​the​ ​potential​ ​challenges​ ​or​ ​limitations​ ​of​ ​using​ ​art​ ​as​ ​a​ ​vehicle​ ​for social​ ​change?
  • What​ ​other​ ​examples​ ​have​ ​you​ ​seen​ ​of​ ​art​ ​as​ ​a​ ​tool​ ​to​ ​raise​ ​awareness​ ​about​ ​an​ ​issue or​ ​bring​ ​about​ ​social​ ​change?
  • How​ ​would​ ​you​ ​use​ ​art​ ​to​ ​change​ ​the​ ​world?

Thinking​ ​points

  • local​ ​vs ​global
  • representation​ ​vs ​signification
  • connotation​ ​vs​ ​denotation
Activities
Street Art Walk

The Inside Out Project follows the tradition of graffiti and other street art forms that arose as both an outlet for creative expression and a form of social protest. Take a walk around the neighborhood surrounding your school or home and investigate the street art around you. Take notes.

  • Describe a piece of street art that you see.
  • Where did you find it (on the side of a building, a bus stop, a street sign)?
  • How would you categorize it (Mural, graffiti, tagging, poster, sticker, flyer, stencil)?
  • What images or symbols do you see?
  • Describe them in detail. What do they represent?
  • What ideas, aspirations, visions, or associations may have inspired this street art?
  • Describe any associations, memories, or emotions the piece evokes for you.
  • How does this experience differ from viewing art in a museum?
  • How does street art function compared to advertising and to signs (such as billboards, street signs, store signage)?
Where in the World

Look​ ​at​ ​the​ ​Inside​ ​Out​ ​Map​ ​on​ ​the​ ​website​.

  • Each​ ​student​ ​can​ ​choose​ ​one​ ​Action​ they ​like,​ ​and​ ​do​ ​research​ ​about​ ​the​ ​country​ ​where​ ​it​ ​took place.​ ​You​ ​can​ ​ask​ ​them​ about ​their​ ​previous​ ​knowledge​ ​of​ ​history​ ​and​ ​current​ ​events​ ​in​ ​these locations and how it relates to the situation in their own country. Students are encouraged to look at the architecture and surroundings of the installations and point out details that they think are important.
  • OR have students find places around the world that address common themes through their Actions.
  • OR have students choose a portrait that speaks to them. Ask them why they chose it, what makes it feel particularly powerful with regards to that Action’s theme/goals.
  • Debrief​ ​and​ ​discuss​ ​it​ ​with​ ​the​ ​whole​ ​class.
  • Ask​ ​each​ ​student​ ​or​ ​group​ ​of​ ​students​ ​to​ ​make​ ​a​ ​presentation.
  • You can do this activity in reverse and have students find places around the world that address common themes through their Actions.
Discuss or Write

Have your students debate their point of view on different subjects (see ideas below). The funny part could be to defend the idea they do not support. The students can also write small argumentative text to defend a point of view or explain their perspective/reflect on a subject related to the project. Don't hesitate to push them to do a little research.

Talk about a relevant issue that could be communicated through the Inside Out Project.

  • What is the problem?
  • What is the historical context of this issue?
  • How can it be solved? Even if it's impossible, what can be changed to fix the issue?
  • How can the Inside Out Project solve this problem?

This reflection can help you craft your statement.

DURING

ORGANIZE YOUR ACTION!

The checklist

Scout for a good wall, fence or land to put up your posters.

  • Make your portraits.
  • Upload your portraits and releases to the website.
  • Paste with your motivated team!
  • Document the process through photos, videos and interviews.
  • Send us your installation and behind-the-scenes images.
  • Share it!
The tools you need
  • Camera or phone
  • Ladder/scaffold/lift
  • Wallpaper paste or wheat paste (water, flour, sugar)
  • Buckets + water
  • Glue brushes
  • Squeegees
  • Cutters
Team Roles

We encourage you to involve students in all stages of the Action. It may even make your job easier!

Depending on the size of your group, you may want to consider assigning members to work together on specialized teams. Carrying out a group Action is a group effort and each member will have something unique to contribute. Here are some suggestions or roles and their responsibilities:

  • Student Leader(s): Oversee the various tasks to make sure everyone is working together.
  • Portrait Photographer: Take portraits of all participants. Make participants feel comfortable and encourage them to express themselves.
  • Portrait Organizer: Name all of the rtrait files with the participant's first and last name and collect all participant release forms.
  • Equipment Managers: Locate and acquire the equipment needed for the action day.
  • Scouting Leaders: Find the ideal location in the school/local community to post posters. Negotiates and obtains the necessary permissions.
  • Communication Team: Use social media and word-of-mouth strategies to promote the group action from start to finish.
  • Pasting Team: Paste portraits on the day of the action. Adults may be needed when gluers need to use scaffolding or an elevator to reach the wall.
  • Photo Team: Take portraits of participants. Document the Action Day processes through photos and videos. (You can also use these to create a video that you can add to your Action page!)
Tips
  • If your students are learning their multiplication tables, have them calculate how many posters will fit on the wall.
  • Before pasting, ask students to say or write a few words about how they feel about the project so far and what they expect for the day.
  • If you teach your students photography or video editing, this is a great opportunity! Have them take portraits of the participants or create a video of the Action including the reactions of other students and passers-by.
Obtain your goals!
Find your wall

Think about where to create your installation and how its location can change the impact of your message. Even if installation opportunities are limited, you can help students think about what the location means and who can see it.

 

Strike your pose

Whether your Action addresses the environment, diversity or education, students should be encouraged to use their portraits to express themselves. They are encouraged to smile, frown, stick out their tongues.

In addition, students are encouraged to use objects or letters to express a message as long as they fit within the portrait.

  • This action in the Netherlands used objects in their portraits to mimic a zoom screen, share headphones with a friend, throw water at each other, and other expressions of both their individuality and their membership in a community.
  • As part of this action, France asked each student to hold up a letter to spell out environmental messages such as "Act Today for Tomorrow."

PLEASE NOTE: Portraits must be cropped to the face to keep the creativity close to the face.

AFTER

TALK ABOUT IT!

What's on their mind?

In any shape you see fit (essay, video, discussion, drawing), ask your students to think about the installation in the message.

  • What was the photoshoot like for you? What was it like to be photographed?
  • Do​ ​you​ ​think​ ​something​ ​changed​ ​thanks​ ​to​ ​the​ ​Action?​ How​ ​so?
  • What​ ​could​ ​have​ ​been​ ​done​ ​differently?
  • In​ ​which​ ​way​ ​Inside​ ​Out​ ​is​ ​a​ ​communication​ ​tool?
  • Think​ ​about​ ​the​ ​moment​ ​before​ ​the​ ​action,​ ​when​ ​you​ ​were​ ​discussing​ ​the​ ​issues​ ​and deciding​ ​your​ ​statement.​ ​Did​ ​you​ ​change​ ​your​ ​mind​ ​since​ ​then?
  • Who interacted with your portraits? What did they think?
  • What did you learn in the process of putting the Action together?
Create content

If your students are old enough to edit videos, invite them to create a video with footage from the pasting day or other content they may have filmed. Feel free to include interviews of students, parents, staff, or passersby!

Write an Article

We have created a section for Education studies in order for you to share with the community. Whether your students have made a drawing, written an essay, or had a group discussion, we would love to read about it and help other leaders get inspired.
You or your students can choose to write an article to be published as an Education case study! Talk about your experience with creating an Action, its impact on the community, and the works that were created by the young participants.

 

You can do so by sending us an email with your text and we will put it online.

Introduce the Inside Out Project

Explain how the Project was Created

- Talk about JR and his artistic journey.

- Watch JR's TED Talk, announcing the launch of the Inside Out Project.

- Watch one of JR's movies such as Faces Places or Inside Out.

Talk about the Inside Out Project

The Inside Out Project was born from the endeavor of changing the world through art. It is a platform that helps people from all around the world to express a message that is important to them, using art.
Anyone can create what we call an “Action” about anything they want, anywhere in the world. More than 400,000 people have participated in 138 countries and territories.

Explain the process

1. Communities come together and compose a common message such as:

  • Celebrating heritage in Peru
  • Fighting for gender equality in Iceland
  • Highlighting the 11 million undocumented immigrants in the United States
  • Fighting government censorship in Turkey

2. They then photograph everyone who supports the message.

3. The group leader, or "Group Leader," then sends the portraits to the Inside Out team, which prints them and sends them back to the Group Leader.

4. The community comes together to create these large portrait installations to promote their message.

It is through the photos of these installations that the message travels around the world. Through Inside Out Actions, you see that communities all over the world have similar interests and are facing the same issues as you. The impact is local but global.
 

        

Introduce your Action

Give examples of Actions related to yours

Use the filters on the map to find Actions with a wide array of themes. If you know your message, find Actions around the world with similar themes to show how participants everywhere connect through common interests and issues.

Feel free to have your students explore the map or browse our Instagram page to find Actions that speak to them and themes that interest them.

Articulate your Action

If you have selected your message, explain it to your students and why it is relevant to them.
If your students are participating in selecting the message, ask them questions to help you narrow down a topic.

  • What​ ​do​ ​YOU​ ​stand​ ​for?
  • Who​ ​are​ ​the​ ​people​ ​you​ ​want​ ​your​ ​Group​ ​Action​ ​to​ ​represent?
  • What​ ​kind​ ​of​ ​issues​ ​exist​ ​in​ ​your​ ​school​/the world ​today?​ ​In​ ​your​ ​opinion,​ ​why​ ​do​ ​they​ ​exist​ ​and how​ ​did​ ​they​ ​spread?
  • What​ ​could​ ​be​ ​a​ ​solution​ ​to​ ​these​ ​problems?
  • Do​ ​you​ ​think​ ​your​ ​Inside​ ​Out​ ​action​ ​could​ ​help​ ​deal​ ​with​ ​these​ ​issues?​ ​Why​ ​and​ ​how?

We encourage you to have your students choose or write your statement.

  • Define the issue.
  • Write your message.
Define your goals

Discuss with your students how creating an Action will help them achieve their goal and express a message.

  • What can an Action’s effect be?
  • How can doing an Inside Out Action help a community?
  • Who do they want to reach?
  • What do they want people to think?
  • How does it feel to be so visible?
  • How can an Inside Out Action impact other people and yourselves?

Help them take up space to express themselves.

Facilitate a Reflection

Depending on the age of the students and the subject being taught, students can create their own work in response to the project. Those can take many forms such as interviewing each other, finding a word/sentence to express their identity/opinion/interest, researching a theme.


The following are some examples of exercises you can do with your students or conversations you can start. These examples are only a few ideas of topics to address. You will find many more examples of activities led by educators in our case study section, on our map, or by asking our team!

 

You can easily put your questions in a questionnaire format and collect answers from your students.

Talk about Art & Public Space

Street art
  • What​ ​do​ ​you​ ​think​ ​street​ ​art​ ​is?
  • Who is creating art​ ​in​ ​your​ ​community/neighbourhood?
  • What​ ​are​ ​their​ ​goals?
  • Is​ ​there​ ​a​ ​message?
  • What​ ​can​ ​street​ ​art​ ​tell​ ​us​ ​about​ ​society?
  • How​ ​can​ ​street​ ​art​ ​be​ ​used​ ​as​ ​a​ ​tool​ ​for​ ​change?
  • What​ ​might​ ​street​ ​art​ ​accomplish​ ​that​ ​other​ ​forms​ ​of​ ​activism​ ​cannot?
Illegality
  • What​ ​is​ ​the​ ​legislation​ ​in​ ​your​ ​community/city/state?​ ​What​ ​about​ ​other​ ​countries?
  • Where is public art accepted and where is it forbidden?
  • What types of street art are considered acceptable?
  • What​ ​do​ ​you​ ​think​ ​about​ ​it?
Reclaiming​ Public Space
  • What​ ​is​ ​public​ ​space?​ ​Who​ ​does​ ​it​ ​belong​ ​to?​ ​What​ ​differences​ ​do​ ​you​ ​see​ ​between public​ ​and​ ​private​ ​spaces ​?
  • How​ ​do​ ​public​ ​spaces​ ​such​ ​as​ ​city​ ​streets,​ ​parks,​ ​and​ ​monuments​ ​shape​ ​and​ ​reflect​ ​the identities​ ​of​ ​the​ ​people​ ​who​ ​live​ ​there ​?
  • What​ ​kind​ ​of​ ​images​ ​do​ ​you​ ​see​ ​in​ ​public​ ​space?​ ​Who​ ​put​ ​them​ ​there?​ ​What​ ​is​ ​their purpose?
  • Does​ ​it​ ​make​ ​a​ ​difference​ ​if​ ​artwork​ ​is​ ​displayed​ ​in​ ​a​ ​public​ ​space​ ​as​ ​opposed​ ​to​ ​an​ ​art gallery?​ ​How​ ​so?
  • What​ ​distinguishes​ ​the​ ​Inside​ ​Out​ ​posters​ ​from​ ​other​ ​forms​ ​of​ ​visual​ ​communication, such​ ​as​ ​advertising​ ​and​ ​signage ​?
Portraits and Identity
  • What​ ​is​ ​an​ ​identity?​ ​What​ ​purpose​ ​does​ ​identity​ ​serve?​ ​Talk​ ​about​ how you identify personally versus how others identify you.
  • What​ ​is​ ​the​ ​connection​ ​between​ ​a​ ​person’s​ ​identity​ ​and​ ​their​ ​face/expression?
  • How​ ​can​ ​portraits​ ​give​ ​voice​ ​to​ ​the​ ​identity​ ​of​ ​a​ ​group​ ​or​ ​community?​ ​Think​ ​of individualism​​ ​versus​​ ​group.
  • Have​ ​you​ ​already​ ​seen​ ​the​ ​face​ ​of​ ​people​ ​used​ ​for​ ​another​ ​purpose?​ ​Give​ ​your​ ​opinion about​ ​it.
Building Community
  • What’s a “community”?
  • How​ ​does​ ​someone​ ​identify​ ​with​ ​his/her​ ​own​ ​community?
  • How do you create a community?
  • What makes a community flourish?
  • What do communities need to survive?
  • How do you build a community?
Art and Social Change
  • Do​ ​research​ ​about​ ​portraiture​ ​in​ ​Art​ ​History.​ ​How​ ​did​ ​portraiture​ ​change​ ​from​ ​the​ ​20th century​ ​to​ ​today?​ ​Thinking​ ​about:​ ​photography​ ​x​ ​painting;​ ​digital​ ​x​ ​analog;​ ​selfies;​ ​artist role.
  • What​ ​role​ ​do​ ​you​ ​think​ ​art​ ​can​ ​or​ ​should​ ​play​ ​in​ ​addressing​ ​social​ ​issues​ ​and​ ​improving conditions​ ​for​ ​the​ ​individuals​ ​and​ ​communities​ ​they​ ​represent?
  • How​ ​can​ ​we​ ​use​ ​art​ ​to​ ​honor​ ​and​ ​remember​ ​people?
  • In​ ​what​ ​ways​ ​can​ ​art​ ​be​ ​an​ ​effective​ ​medium​ ​to​ ​address​ ​social​ ​injustice​ ​issues?
  • What​ ​are​ ​some​ ​of​ ​the​ ​potential​ ​challenges​ ​or​ ​limitations​ ​of​ ​using​ ​art​ ​as​ ​a​ ​vehicle​ ​for social​ ​change?
  • What​ ​other​ ​examples​ ​have​ ​you​ ​seen​ ​of​ ​art​ ​as​ ​a​ ​tool​ ​to​ ​raise​ ​awareness​ ​about​ ​an​ ​issue or​ ​bring​ ​about​ ​social​ ​change?
  • How​ ​would​ ​you​ ​use​ ​art​ ​to​ ​change​ ​the​ ​world?

Thinking​ ​points

  • local​ ​vs ​global
  • representation​ ​vs ​signification
  • connotation​ ​vs​ ​denotation

Activities

Street Art Walk

The Inside Out Project follows the tradition of graffiti and other street art forms that arose as both an outlet for creative expression and a form of social protest. Take a walk around the neighborhood surrounding your school or home and investigate the street art around you. Take notes.

  • Describe a piece of street art that you see.
  • Where did you find it (on the side of a building, a bus stop, a street sign)?
  • How would you categorize it (Mural, graffiti, tagging, poster, sticker, flyer, stencil)?
  • What images or symbols do you see?
  • Describe them in detail. What do they represent?
  • What ideas, aspirations, visions, or associations may have inspired this street art?
  • Describe any associations, memories, or emotions the piece evokes for you.
  • How does this experience differ from viewing art in a museum?
  • How does street art function compared to advertising and to signs (such as billboards, street signs, store signage)?
Where in the World

Look​ ​at​ ​the​ ​Inside​ ​Out​ ​Map​ ​on​ ​the​ ​website​.

  • Each​ ​student​ ​can​ ​choose​ ​one​ ​Action​ they ​like,​ ​and​ ​do​ ​research​ ​about​ ​the​ ​country​ ​where​ ​it​ ​took place.​ ​You​ ​can​ ​ask​ ​them​ about ​their​ ​previous​ ​knowledge​ ​of​ ​history​ ​and​ ​current​ ​events​ ​in​ ​these locations and how it relates to the situation in their own country. Students are encouraged to look at the architecture and surroundings of the installations and point out details that they think are important.
  • OR have students find places around the world that address common themes through their Actions.
  • OR have students choose a portrait that speaks to them. Ask them why they chose it, what makes it feel particularly powerful with regards to that Action’s theme/goals.
  • Debrief​ ​and​ ​discuss​ ​it​ ​with​ ​the​ ​whole​ ​class.
  • Ask​ ​each​ ​student​ ​or​ ​group​ ​of​ ​students​ ​to​ ​make​ ​a​ ​presentation.
  • You can do this activity in reverse and have students find places around the world that address common themes through their Actions.
Discuss or Write

Have your students debate their point of view on different subjects (see ideas below). The funny part could be to defend the idea they do not support. The students can also write small argumentative text to defend a point of view or explain their perspective/reflect on a subject related to the project. Don't hesitate to push them to do a little research.

Talk about a relevant issue that could be communicated through the Inside Out Project.

  • What is the problem?
  • What is the historical context of this issue?
  • How can it be solved? Even if it's impossible, what can be changed to fix the issue?
  • How can the Inside Out Project solve this problem?

This reflection can help you craft your statement.

The checklist

Scout for a good wall, fence or land to put up your posters.

  • Make your portraits.
  • Upload your portraits and releases to the website.
  • Paste with your motivated team!
  • Document the process through photos, videos and interviews.
  • Send us your installation and behind-the-scenes images.
  • Share it!

The tools you need

  • Camera or phone
  • Ladder/scaffold/lift
  • Wallpaper paste or wheat paste (water, flour, sugar)
  • Buckets + water
  • Glue brushes
  • Squeegees
  • Cutters

Team Roles

We encourage you to involve students in all stages of the Action. It may even make your job easier!

Depending on the size of your group, you may want to consider assigning members to work together on specialized teams. Carrying out a group Action is a group effort and each member will have something unique to contribute. Here are some suggestions or roles and their responsibilities:

  • Student Leader(s): Oversee the various tasks to make sure everyone is working together.
  • Portrait Photographer: Take portraits of all participants. Make participants feel comfortable and encourage them to express themselves.
  • Portrait Organizer: Name all of the rtrait files with the participant's first and last name and collect all participant release forms.
  • Equipment Managers: Locate and acquire the equipment needed for the action day.
  • Scouting Leaders: Find the ideal location in the school/local community to post posters. Negotiates and obtains the necessary permissions.
  • Communication Team: Use social media and word-of-mouth strategies to promote the group action from start to finish.
  • Pasting Team: Paste portraits on the day of the action. Adults may be needed when gluers need to use scaffolding or an elevator to reach the wall.
  • Photo Team: Take portraits of participants. Document the Action Day processes through photos and videos. (You can also use these to create a video that you can add to your Action page!)

Tips

  • If your students are learning their multiplication tables, have them calculate how many posters will fit on the wall.
  • Before pasting, ask students to say or write a few words about how they feel about the project so far and what they expect for the day.
  • If you teach your students photography or video editing, this is a great opportunity! Have them take portraits of the participants or create a video of the Action including the reactions of other students and passers-by.

Obtain your goals!

Find your wall

Think about where to create your installation and how its location can change the impact of your message. Even if installation opportunities are limited, you can help students think about what the location means and who can see it.

 

Strike your pose

Whether your Action addresses the environment, diversity or education, students should be encouraged to use their portraits to express themselves. They are encouraged to smile, frown, stick out their tongues.

In addition, students are encouraged to use objects or letters to express a message as long as they fit within the portrait.

  • This action in the Netherlands used objects in their portraits to mimic a zoom screen, share headphones with a friend, throw water at each other, and other expressions of both their individuality and their membership in a community.
  • As part of this action, France asked each student to hold up a letter to spell out environmental messages such as "Act Today for Tomorrow."

PLEASE NOTE: Portraits must be cropped to the face to keep the creativity close to the face.

What's on their mind?

In any shape you see fit (essay, video, discussion, drawing), ask your students to think about the installation in the message.

  • What was the photoshoot like for you? What was it like to be photographed?
  • Do​ ​you​ ​think​ ​something​ ​changed​ ​thanks​ ​to​ ​the​ ​Action?​ How​ ​so?
  • What​ ​could​ ​have​ ​been​ ​done​ ​differently?
  • In​ ​which​ ​way​ ​Inside​ ​Out​ ​is​ ​a​ ​communication​ ​tool?
  • Think​ ​about​ ​the​ ​moment​ ​before​ ​the​ ​action,​ ​when​ ​you​ ​were​ ​discussing​ ​the​ ​issues​ ​and deciding​ ​your​ ​statement.​ ​Did​ ​you​ ​change​ ​your​ ​mind​ ​since​ ​then?
  • Who interacted with your portraits? What did they think?
  • What did you learn in the process of putting the Action together?

Create content

If your students are old enough to edit videos, invite them to create a video with footage from the pasting day or other content they may have filmed. Feel free to include interviews of students, parents, staff, or passersby!

Write an Article

We have created a section for Education studies in order for you to share with the community. Whether your students have made a drawing, written an essay, or had a group discussion, we would love to read about it and help other leaders get inspired.
You or your students can choose to write an article to be published as an Education case study! Talk about your experience with creating an Action, its impact on the community, and the works that were created by the young participants.

 

You can do so by sending us an email with your text and we will put it online.

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